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Text Comparison"Death And The Maiden - Film Vs....� � � � � �

"This stanza may be regarded as an answer to the question in the : When dying one rests on some loving friend, and needs the tears of affection; and even after one is buried the same natural desire for loving rememberance shows itself; and when all is dust and ashes the fire that was accustomed to be in those ashes lives in them (and finds expression in the inscription on the tombs).
Here Mitford quotes Drayton and Pope: -

''It is some comfort to a wretch to die,
(If there be comfort in the way of death)
To have some friend, or kind alliance by
To be officious at the parting breath.'' - Moses

''No friend's complaint, no kind domestic tear
Pleased thy pale ghost, or graced thy mournful bier,
By foreign hands thy dying eyes were closed.'' - Elegy, 81."

"This stanza may be regarded as an answer to the question in the : When dying one rests on some loving friend, and needs the tears of affection; and even after one is buried the same natural desire for loving rememberance shows itself; and when all is dust and ashes the fire that was accustomed to be in those ashes lives in them (and finds expression in the inscription on the tombs).
Here Mitford quotes Drayton and Pope: -

''It is some comfort to a wretch to die,
(If there be comfort in the way of death)
To have some friend, or kind alliance by
To be officious at the parting breath.'' - Moses

''No friend's complaint, no kind domestic tear
Pleased thy pale ghost, or graced thy mournful bier,
By foreign hands thy dying eyes were closed.'' - Elegy, 81."

The movie version starts by playing a section from Schubert’s quartet Death and the Maiden.

Death and the Maiden Essay Questions | GradeSaver

Death’s looming presence overshadows the character’s actions in both Ismail Kadare’s Broken April and Ariel Dorfman’s Death and the Maiden.

"G[ray]. wrote to Walpole, 3 March 1751 (Corresp i 344): 'I humbly propose, for the benefit of Mr. Dodsley and his matrons, that take awake for a verb, that they should read asleep, and all will be right.' If G. was referring to the comma which appeared after 'Awake', the fault was his own (see his letter to Walpole of 11 Feb. above). It was removed in ed 3.
In 1768 G. acknowledged as the source of this line Petrarch's Sonnet 169 (more usually numbered 170), which he himself had earlier translated into Latin (see p. 309): Ch'i veggio nel pensier, dolce mio fuoco, / Fredda una lingua, & due begli occhi chiusi / Rimaner doppa noi pien di faville (For I see in my thoughts, my sweet fire, one cold tongue and two beautiful closed eyes will remain full of sparks after our death). But there are other parallels with G.'s image and thought: e.g. Lucretius iv 925-6: Quippe ubi nulla latens animai pars remaneret / in membris, cinere ut multa latet obrutus ignis (Since, if no part of the spirit were left hidden in the limbs, like fire covered in a heap of ashes); Ovid, Tristia III iii 81-4: Tu tamen extincto feralia munera semper / deque tuis lacrimis umida serta dato. / quamvis in cineres corpus mutaverit ignis, / sentiet officium maesta favilla pium (Yet do you ever give to the dead the funeral offerings and garlands moist with your own tears. Although the fire change my body to ashes, the sorrowing dust shall feel the pious care); Propertius, Elegies II xiii 42: Non nihil ad verum conscia terra sapit (Not at all unconscious and witless of the truth are the ashes of man: i.e. of the way his memory is regarded after death); Ausonius, Parentalia, Praefatio 11-12: Gaudent compositi cineres sua nomina dici: / frontibus hoc scriptis et monumenta iubent (Our dead ones laid to rest rejoice to hear their names: and thus even the lettered stones above their graves would have us do). Arthur Johnston, Selected Poems of Gray and Collins (1967) p. 46, cites the translation of Euripides, Bacchae 8, in the life of Solon in Plutarch's Lives (1683) vol i: 'Still in their embers living the strong fire'. See also Young, Night Thoughts i 105-7: 'Why wanders wretched Thought their tombs around, / In infidel Distress? Are Angels there? / Slumbers, rak'd up in dust, Etherial fire?' The version of the line which appeared in edd 1-7 echoes Pope, Eloisa to Abelard 54: 'Warm from the soul, and faithful to its fires'."

"In the Pembroke MS. of the ''Elegy'' Gray has entered after this stanza: ''Insert

There scattered oft, the earliest of the year,
By hands unseen, are showers of violets found;
The red-breast loves to build, and warble there,
And little footsteps lightly print the ground.''
This stanza, which may be described as ''the redbreast stanza,'' was first printed in the third edition of the ''Elegy,'' the date of which I have been able to fix as March, 1751, as I find the ''Elegy'' with the redbreast stanza in the ''Scots' Magazine'' for that month, and it was then published in the end of the month. Opposite this stanza in the Pembroke MS. Gray has written ''Omitted, 1753.'' Mason states that the reason for his omitting it was ''because he thought that it was too long a parenthesis in this place.'' Another reason may be that this stanza was different in character from the preceding, as it dealt in fancies whereas the former described facts. Also he may have noted the resemblence it bears to some expressions and lines in Collins' ''Dirge in Cymbeline'' (pub. 1747): -
''Soft maids and village hinds shall bring
Each opening sweet of earliest bloom. ...
The red-breast oft, at evening hours,
Shall kindly lend its little aid,'' etc."

Death and the Maiden - UK Essays

"This stanza may be regarded as an answer to the question in the : When dying one rests on some loving friend, and needs the tears of affection; and even after one is buried the same natural desire for loving rememberance shows itself; and when all is dust and ashes the fire that was accustomed to be in those ashes lives in them (and finds expression in the inscription on the tombs).
Here Mitford quotes Drayton and Pope: -

''It is some comfort to a wretch to die,
(If there be comfort in the way of death)
To have some friend, or kind alliance by
To be officious at the parting breath.'' - Moses

''No friend's complaint, no kind domestic tear
Pleased thy pale ghost, or graced thy mournful bier,
By foreign hands thy dying eyes were closed.'' - Elegy, 81."

"This stanza may be regarded as an answer to the question in the : When dying one rests on some loving friend, and needs the tears of affection; and even after one is buried the same natural desire for loving rememberance shows itself; and when all is dust and ashes the fire that was accustomed to be in those ashes lives in them (and finds expression in the inscription on the tombs).
Here Mitford quotes Drayton and Pope: -

''It is some comfort to a wretch to die,
(If there be comfort in the way of death)
To have some friend, or kind alliance by
To be officious at the parting breath.'' - Moses

''No friend's complaint, no kind domestic tear
Pleased thy pale ghost, or graced thy mournful bier,
By foreign hands thy dying eyes were closed.'' - Elegy, 81."

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Death and the Maiden Essay - 266 Words - StudyMode


Power In Death And The Maiden English Literature Essay

"A reflection upon the fact, noted in the preceding stanzas, that even the humblest of mankind try to perpetuate themselves by monuments and inscriptions. 'For who, even when death's hand was upon his very speech and memory, ever turned to die without regret for the pleasures and anxieties which fill human life, and without a desire to retain the human sympathy that he found there? Why! the instinct is so strong that even from the tomb itself, nay, even from our very ashes, it manages to find expression.' (Witness the 'uncouth rhymes' and inscriptions by which even these insignificant and ignorant dead strive to preserve their identity.)"

Free Essays on Death and the Maiden by Ariel Dorfman

"A reflection upon the fact, noted in the preceding stanzas, that even the humblest of mankind try to perpetuate themselves by monuments and inscriptions. 'For who, even when death's hand was upon his very speech and memory, ever turned to die without regret for the pleasures and anxieties which fill human life, and without a desire to retain the human sympathy that he found there? Why! the instinct is so strong that even from the tomb itself, nay, even from our very ashes, it manages to find expression.' (Witness the 'uncouth rhymes' and inscriptions by which even these insignificant and ignorant dead strive to preserve their identity.)"

Death and the Maiden Summary | GradeSaver

"A reflection upon the fact, noted in the preceding stanzas, that even the humblest of mankind try to perpetuate themselves by monuments and inscriptions. 'For who, even when death's hand was upon his very speech and memory, ever turned to die without regret for the pleasures and anxieties which fill human life, and without a desire to retain the human sympathy that he found there? Why! the instinct is so strong that even from the tomb itself, nay, even from our very ashes, it manages to find expression.' (Witness the 'uncouth rhymes' and inscriptions by which even these insignificant and ignorant dead strive to preserve their identity.)"

Govt College Bangana | Essay death and the maiden

"A reflection upon the fact, noted in the preceding stanzas, that even the humblest of mankind try to perpetuate themselves by monuments and inscriptions. 'For who, even when death's hand was upon his very speech and memory, ever turned to die without regret for the pleasures and anxieties which fill human life, and without a desire to retain the human sympathy that he found there? Why! the instinct is so strong that even from the tomb itself, nay, even from our very ashes, it manages to find expression.' (Witness the 'uncouth rhymes' and inscriptions by which even these insignificant and ignorant dead strive to preserve their identity.)"

Death and the maiden quartet analysis essay - Pest …

"A reflection upon the fact, noted in the preceding stanzas, that even the humblest of mankind try to perpetuate themselves by monuments and inscriptions. 'For who, even when death's hand was upon his very speech and memory, ever turned to die without regret for the pleasures and anxieties which fill human life, and without a desire to retain the human sympathy that he found there? Why! the instinct is so strong that even from the tomb itself, nay, even from our very ashes, it manages to find expression.' (Witness the 'uncouth rhymes' and inscriptions by which even these insignificant and ignorant dead strive to preserve their identity.)"

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