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by Teachers' collection of business and administrative studies essays

The World Language Education major at the University of Georgia prepares students to teach modern, classical, and less commonly taught languages in pre-school through 12th grade. The major is classified as high demand, admitting a maximum of only 20 students per cohort.

Turfgrass Management is the science and culture of fine grasses used on golf courses, athletic fields, parks, schools, commercial grounds, home lawns, and other areas requiring an attractive but functional ground cover.

Fields of Vision: Essays in FilmStudies, Visual Anthropology and Photography.

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Women's Studies is an emerging field of scholarship that provides interdisciplinary perspectives on women, gender, and sexual orientation.

In almost all cases, baccalaureate degrees are required for admission to schools of medicine, dentistry and optometry. At the University of Georgia, 'pre-med,' 'pre-dental,' and 'pre-optometry' are not majors, so students who plan to attend medical, dental, or optometry school should select majors that follow established degree programs. There is no one 'best' major for students interested in these areas, but it is critical that course selection includes both those science courses needed to assure a competitive score on the standardized admissions tests and the course prerequisites for admission to the medical, dental or optometry schools to which the student is interested in applying.

In almost all cases, baccalaureate degrees are required for admission to schools of medicine, dentistry and optometry. At the University of Georgia, 'pre-med,' 'pre-dental,' and 'pre-optometry' are not majors, so students who plan to attend medical, dental, or optometry school should select majors that follow established degree programs. There is no one 'best' major for students interested in these areas, but it is critical that course selection includes both those science courses needed to assure a competitive score on the standardized admissions tests and the course prerequisites for admission to the medical, dental or optometry schools to which the student is interested in applying.

edited by Leslie Devereaux and Roger Hillman

In almost all cases, baccalaureate degrees are required for admission to schools of medicine, dentistry and optometry. At the University of Georgia, 'pre-med,' 'pre-dental,' and 'pre-optometry' are not majors, so students who plan to attend medical, dental, or optometry school should select majors that follow established degree programs. There is no one 'best' major for students interested in these areas, but it is critical that course selection includes both those science courses needed to assure a competitive score on the standardized admissions tests and the course prerequisites for admission to the medical, dental or optometry schools to which the student is interested in applying.

Jeb Byers, Associate Professor in the Odum School of Ecology, encourages his students to get involved–both in his classes and in research.

Majors take 45 hours in art courses beyond their core courses including painting, printmaking, ceramics, sculpture, a studio sequence, art education, and art history. In addition, they must take 18 hours in professional education courses including 9 in student teaching; the B.F.A. is a prerequisite for initial teacher certification. Successful B.F.A. graduates will demonstrate a professional knowledge of fundamental art concepts, materials, and teaching techniques in order to nurture aesthetic understanding, critical thinking abilities, and visual literacy in the field.

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Volume 3, Number 1, January 1996


Fifty Orwell Essays - Project Gutenberg Australia

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Martin Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Martin Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies; Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To examine how history and social transformations are represented in three Spanish literary works.

Module Content: This course will analyse representations of historical and social change in three Spanish literary works published between the late 19th and the early 20th century. It will provide an exploration of decisive social and historical transformations that occurred in Spain at the time and the way in which those changes are depicted in the literature of the period.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the major social and historical transformations that occurred in Spain during the period.
?Describe the literary context of the works.
?Discuss the nature of the interaction between history and literature in the works studied.
?Analyse the importance of the input of these writers within the context of Spanish literature.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay 100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by the Department)).

Fifty Orwell Essays, by George Orwell, free ebook

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) in Art Education at the University of Georgia prepares art teachers at the elementary, middle, and high school levels to promote the central role of the visual arts in the lives of their students.

Heritales – Let's watch our Heritage!

Students achieve a basic knowledge of the history of art within the broader context of social, intellectual, and cultural history by taking survey courses; upper level art history; major elective courses within the humanities, sciences, and social sciences (excluding studio art and art history but including a foreign language through the fourth semester); and a second approved literature course in addition to the college requirement. The combination of these courses develops critical and rhetorical skills necessary for success in the field.

29 Jul - Magic Lantern Society meeting in Deal, to see David

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): HS2026

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Seana Ryan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Ms Seana Ryan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' knowledge of the linguistics of Spanish as it is spoken throughout the Hispanic world.

Module Content: This module will examine sociolinguistic variation within Spanish as it is spoken both throughout the Hispanic world and further afield, exploring in greater detail relevant issues such as bilingualism, code-switching and Spanish-based pidgins and creoles. The economics of language, the use of Spanish on the internet, the growth of Spanglish and the significance of the rapidly increasing Hispanic demographic in the U.S. will also comprise key points for discussion.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss the role played by the Spanish language throughout the world today.
?Outline the sociolingustic factors which may impact on the growth and evolution of a language.
?Demonstrate an awareness of the economics of language and the value of Spanish in a global context.
?Outline the areas where Spanish is spoken today and the various sociolinguistic, political and cultural issues facing Spanish speakers in these areas.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x Extended Essay (2,000 words) 60 marks; 1 x Group Presentation 40 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by the Department of Hispanic Studies)).

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