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Nervous Conditions Essay Gender Inequality …

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18weeks(s) Placements (Supervision, Role Modelling, Reflection and Field Visits).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Maria O'Shea, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Lecturer(s): Ms Maria O'Shea, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Prof Eileen Savage, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery, and Staff participating Health Service Providers.

Module Objective: To facilitate students' continuing practice with particular emphasis on achieving Clinical Learning Outcomes in nursing/midwifery care activities within the five domains of Nursing practice, as specified by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland (NMBI) and Clinical skills as specified by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Module Content: Clinical practice (under supervision) in general/children's nursing/midwifery units/contexts with an emphasis on the five domains of clinical practice (1. Professional/ethical practice, 2. Holistic approaches to care and the integration of knowledge, 3. Interpersonal relationships, 4. Organisational and management of care and, 5. Personal and professional development) and Promoting health and wellbeing of patients/clients and their families. Content relating to Mandatory/Essential skills (e.g. Moving and Handling, Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, National Early Warning Score (NEWS), Intravenous Fluid Management skills, hand hygiene, waste segregation, blood and body fluid exposure). Introduction and utilisation of the Competence Booklet, clinical placement procedures and processes. Competencies and clinical skills in general/children's nursing/midwifery practice, reflection-on-practice and practice placement policies and procedures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss CLOs and Clinical skills achieved at exposure and/or participation levels with registered nurses/midwives using examples from clinical practice.
?Participate in the delivery of patient/client care under supervision on a sustained basis with minimal prompting.
?Discuss personal and professional growth and development through identifying own learning needs and self-evaluation of clinical learning in interview process (CLO Booklet).
?Discuss rationale for nursing care activities drawing on current research findings.
?Discuss and manage allocated case load of patients/clients (under supervision).
?Discuss national (e.g. NMBI) and local (Health service provider and School of Nursing and Midwifery) policies and guidelines.

Assessment: Completion of required Clinical Learning Outcomes and clinical skills at exposure and participation (CLO Booklet) (Pass/Fail). Attendance in Clinical Practice over 21 weeks as scheduled in the programme (Pass/Fail). Completion of Clinical Hours record time sheet (Yes/No).

Compulsory Elements: Students must complete all Preparatory Practice Requirements prior to commencing clinical practice placements as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: ?Achievement of CLOs and skills as specified in the CLO Booklet signed and dated by both student and registered nurse/midwife.?Completion of the required reflective notes, interviews and clinical placement details, signed and dated by both student and registered nurse.?Completion of student 'End of Year Declaration' and 'Student self-assessment' pages in Competency Booklet.?Completion of scheduled clinical time (18 weeks), submission of a signed and completed time sheet by the specified submission date to the Allocations Office, UCC.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students failing to achieve a pass judgement at the Autumn Examination Board will be required to repeat the module in a repeat year. Failure to attend 'repeat time' and/or 'time owing' as prescribed/scheduled by the School of Nursing and Midwifery will result in a fail judgement and students will be required to repeat the module in a repeat year.

The liberal wing of the antiwar movement, represented by groups such as SANE, WSP, Student Peace Union, and Americans for Democratic Action, supported détente, diplomacy, and demilitarization of the Cold War, paying particular attention to the nuclear arms race. Liberal peace groups worked to build a broad-based movement, gain positive media attention, and influence members of Congress – all essential elements of movement-building. At the same time, they tended to narrow their vision and political goals to what was feasible within the American context, which fell short of what was needed to achieve peace in the international context. The unwillingness of liberal peace groups to support U.S. withdrawal from South Vietnam not only divided the antiwar movement but also constituted a missed opportunity to combine domestic peace efforts with international diplomatic efforts led by UN Secretary-General U Thant, which were based on the Geneva formula. According to the historian Milton Katz:

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Another reform initiative addressed the profound discrimination experienced by Native Americans, but space allows only brief mention. These developments in policy governing Native American education, including the Indian Education Act of 1972, contributed to equalization of opportunity by recognizing Native Americans’ justified desire for more autonomy in governing their educational institutions and having a genuine voice on commissions and in the newly created Office of Indian Education (for the history of education policy regarding Native Americans, see Szasz ; Hale ).

Such practices violated important tenets of international law, including the 1949 Fourth Geneva Convention on the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War. The moral and legal issues hardly concerned American military leadership, but they ate away at the conscience of many “grunts” and raised questions for an American public increasingly disenchanted with the war.

A free essay on Nervous Conditions essays

Glen noted that some American troops “for mere pleasure, fire indiscriminately into Vietnamese homes and, without provocation or justification, shoot at the people themselves,” and that “severe beatings and torture at knife point are usual means of questioning captives.” He ended by asking General Abrams to implement the codes of the Geneva Conventions. Abrams passed Glen’s letter on to Major Colin Powell (future Secretary of State), who never interviewed Glen and dismissed the allegations as overly broad and without documentation.

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Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 7weeks(s) Placements (Supervision, Role Modelling, and Reflection); 26hr(s) Other (Lectures, Practicals, Directed Learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Ms Maria O'Shea, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Lecturer(s): Ms Maria O'Shea, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Staff, School of Nursing & Midwifery, & participating Health Service Providers.

Module Objective: To facilitate students' practice with particular emphasis on exposure and participation in patient/client care within the five domains of Nursing practice, as specified by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Ireland (NMBI) and Clinical skills as specified by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Module Content: Clinical practice (under direct supervision) in general/children's nursing/midwifery units/contexts with an emphasis on the five domains of clinical practice (1. Professional/ethical practice, 2. Holistic approaches to care and the integration of knowledge, 3. Interpersonal relationships, 4. Organisational and management of care, and 5. Personal and professional development), and promoting health and wellbeing of patients/clients and their families. Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, First aid, content relating to mandatory skills (e.g. Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers, Moving and Handling programme, hand hygiene, waste segregation, blood and body fluid exposure). Introduction to and utilisation of the Clinical Learning Outcomes (CLOs) Booklet, clinical placement procedures and processes. CLOs and Clinical skills in general/children's nursing/midwifery practice, reflection-on-practice, and practice placement policies and procedures.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Discuss CLOs and Clinical skills achieved at exposure and/or participation levels with registered nurses/midwives using examples from clinical practice.
?Demonstrate development of the skill of reflective practice through written reflective notes as required per practice placement to registered nurses/midwives.
?Discuss personal and professional growth and development through identifying own learning needs and self-evaluation of clinical learning in interview process (CLO Booklet).
?Discuss national (e.g. NMBI) and local (Health service provider and School of Nursing and Midwifery) policies and guidelines.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment: Completion of required Clinical Learning Outcomes and Clinical skills at exposure and participation levels (CLO booklet) (Pass/Fail). Attendance in Clinical Practice over 7 weeks as scheduled in the programme (Pass/Fail). Completion of Clinical Hours record time sheet (Yes/No).

Compulsory Elements: Students must complete all Preparatory Practice Requirements prior to commencing clinical practice placements as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: ? Achievement of CLOs and skills as specified in the CLO Booklet signed and dated by both student and registered nurse/midwife.? Completion of the required reflective notes, interviews and clinical placement details, signed and dated by both student and registered nurse/midwife.? Completion of student 'End of Year Declaration' and 'Student self-assessment' pages in CLO Booklet.? Completion of scheduled clinical time (over 7 weeks), submission of a signed and completed time sheet by the specified submission date to the Allocations Office, UCC.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Passed elements of continuous assessment are carried forward. Failed elements must be repeated as prescribed by the School of Nursing and Midwifery. Students failing to achieve a pass judgement at the Autumn Examination Board will be required to repeat the module in a repeat year. In addition, failure to attend 'repeat time' and/or 'time owing' as prescribed/scheduled by the School of Nursing and Midwifery will result in a fail judgement and students will be required to repeat the module in a repeat year.

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SparkNotes: Nervous Conditions: Key Facts

The story that was heard in the U.S., however, was that of Douglas Pike, an employee of the U.S. Information Agency, who blamed the civilian deaths entirely on the insurgents and warned that more massacres could be expected should South Vietnam fall to the communists. His story was spread by U.S. agencies and the American Friends of Vietnam, which issued a pamphlet in June 1969 warning that the “massacres at Hue … were only the most outrageous in a long history of such Communist atrocities.” Excerpts of Pike’s story also appeared in Reader’s Digest (September 1970) in part to counter revelations of American atrocities at My Lai. Writing forty years later, the American military historian James Willbanks concludes:

SparkNotes: Nervous Conditions: Themes, Motifs, and Symbols

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 250.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48hr(s) Other (Lectures, Tutorials, Directed Learning); 152hr(s) Other (Self-Directed Study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Lynne Marsh, School of Nursing & Midwifery.

Lecturer(s): Dr Lynne Marsh, School of Nursing & Midwifery; Ms Claire Dorrity, School of Applied Social Studies, and Staff, School of Nursing and Midwifery.

Module Objective: This module is aimed at 1. Ensuring that nurses recognise the particular needs of people with disabilities and work towards promoting and improving their health and 2. Developing an awareness of social policy interventions for improving health and wellbeing, with a particular focus on disability.

Module Content: Social Policy (20 hours):
This module will provide students with an introduction to key areas of social policy in the delivery of healthcare. A particular focus will be placed on issues relating to welfare, recognition, redistribution, equity, social inclusion, and the relationship between poverty and health. Key concepts such as antidiscrimination, empowerment, advocacy and rights will be explored. Marginalisation with reference to disability, mental health, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, and status will be examined. This social versus medical perspective on disability, and issues relating to social justice will be highlighted with a view to developing awareness, anti- discrimination, and intercultural skills and competency in professional practice.

Nursing (28 hours):
Physical disability, intellectual and sensory disability. Definitions, classification and terminology associated with disabilities. Diagnosis of a disability and associated genetic science. Support of the individual and the family in diagnosis of a chronic condition or disability. The social impact of chronic ill health and disability on the person and the family across the lifespan. Developmental issues and care of children and adolescents with different levels of ability. Consideration of relevant legislation and rights of persons with disability. Supporting equal access to public services, resources and supports for individuals and their families. The Role of the Registered Nurse in supporting people with disabilities.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Explain the key issues relating to social policy, social inclusion and health.
?Describe the impact of health practice on marginalised social groups.
?Examine practices relating to anti-discrimination, oppression, inequality, race/ethnicity, and disability.
?Explore the impact of current social policy on the lives of individuals with disabilities.
?Employ an anti-discriminatory and culturally sensitve approach to professional practice.
?Discuss supporting inclusion for people with chronic conditions, physical, sensory and intellectual disability.
?Discuss the impact for a family on diagnosis of a condition or a disability and outline the supports available.
?Discuss the role of health care teams in supporting individuals with chronic conditions and/or physical, sensory or intellectual disability to optimise their quality of life.
?Discuss the role of the nurse in optimising the experience of all individuals and their families when they are accessing acute health care services.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 200 marks (1 x 3 hour paper).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination. Attendance and participation in all timetabled teaching activities.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 50%.

Formal Written Examination: to be taken in Winter 2017.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2018.

Description and explanation of the major themes of Nervous Conditions

American bombing missions were enabled by the U.S. global military base structure, which allowed airplanes to carry out missions from as far away as Guam, Okinawa, the Philippines, and Thailand, and by the construction of air-bases, landing fields, military compounds, roads, ports and energy depots in South Vietnam by two politically connected companies, Bechtel and Kellogg, Brown and Root. For the Pentagon, Vietnam served as a “remarkable technological opportunity,” in the words of General Maxwell Taylor, for showcasing new super-weapons developed by military scientists and engineers. Following the Soviets launching of Sputnik in 1958, the Eisenhower administration founded the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), whose mission was to recruit top scientific talent for developing cutting edge military technologies that would enable the U.S. to win the Cold War. In 1971, it was estimated that more than 240,000 technological and scientific workers were involved in war related production or research. Their output was considerable.

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