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Relationship Between Language Culture And Identity …

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 6, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Stephen Boyd, Department of Hispanic Studies; Dr Martin Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies; Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: This course sets out to provide an overview of key debates and approaches in the field of Iberian Studies in order to prepare the student for research on a range of topics in the field. Most of the texts studied are available in Spanish and English.

Module Content: Drawing on a range of theories, this module will provide an overview of current research in Iberian Studies, focusing on different approaches to the following topics: cultural and political history of the Iberian peninsula; language, politics and society; medieval and modern literature; visual arts; theatre and performance; cinema and screen media; gender and urban space. Students will be encouraged to take a comparative approach, drawing on texts and case studies from other cultural contexts

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Outline the major historical events that shaped society and culture in the Iberian peninsula.
?Analyse and understand the construction of contemporary identities and communities in the Iberian peninsula, identifying their multiple constitution in relation to other identities and cultures (European, diasporic etc.).
?Select and apply appropriate theories and approaches to the analysis of selected individual texts by one or more of the authors studied.
?Show knowledge and understanding of the relationship between language, culture and identity in the Iberian space
?Understand and apply different approaches to the study of Iberian history, society and culture
?Compare and contrast the political and cultural situation of the different communites, languages and cultures that share the Iberian space on a regional, national and international scale.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks ( 1 x 3,000 word essay (100 marks); 1 oral presentation (100 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars; 12 x 2hr(s) Directed Study.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Prof Nuala Finnegan, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To analyse the relationship between culture and politics in modern Latin America with particular reference to literature, film and debates about national identity.

Module Content: This course will explore the interplay between culture and politics on various levels, e.g. the political ramifications of cultural production; the study of cultural politics; the cultural dimensions of power and/or the study of power and politics in recent examples of Latin American culture. Course content will vary to cater to student need on the course but may include cover recent Mexican cinema and literature including authors Elena Poniatowksa or Rosario Castellanos along with history, literature and film from the Southern Cone and/or Central America. It may also include texts that examine the debate around Chicano and Latino cultural production in the U.S.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically evaluate the relationship between culture and politics with reference to selected texts
?Situate and analyse texts with due regard to their historical and social contexts
?Apply an appropriate theoretical framework to their critical analysis.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 Essay (3,000 words) 100 marks; 1 Oral Project/Presentation (30 mins) 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

This essay has been submitted by a student

Relationship between religion and science - Wikipedia

Culture and Conflict | Beyond Intractability

Anthropological linguistics is the study of the relations between language and culture and the relations between human biology, cognition and language.

Due to this inseparable relationship between language and culture, foreign language teaching is seen void without intercultural consciousness and intercultural discovery.

Culture-Based Negotiation Styles | Beyond Intractability

The difficulty, then, lies in understanding the dynamic of the relationship between language and culture and how to exploit it for teaching foreign language with improved effectiveness.

Why Nerds are Unpopular - Paul Graham

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 6.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): HS2101 or HS2102 and HS2014

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Mr Stephen Boyd, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Mr Stephen Boyd, Department of Hispanic Studies; Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To develop students' awareness of the relationship between culture and identity in the Iberian Peninsula through analysis of a series of first-person narrative constructions in Spanish, paying close attention to the specific historical and socio-cultural environments in which they were produced.

Module Content: The study of a sample selection of first-person narratives produced in different periods and sociocultural contexts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Critically read/view the set texts.
?Read closely [in the case of literary texts], paying attention to language, imagery, narrative technique, register, style, generic form and characterisation.
?Relate the set texts to one another.
?Connect the set texts to a tradition or a period.
?Apply critical/theoretical terms and concepts to the set texts.
?Work and learn with others.
?Participate in class discussions.
?Write clearly-structured essays in correct Standard English.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( 1 x 2,500-word essay (50 marks); 1 x Class Test (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by the Department of Hispanic Studies).).

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Lost in Translation? | The New Yorker


UCC Book of Modules, 2017/2018: HSXXXX

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Lectures (/Seminars); 3 x 2hr(s) Other (Optional film viewing hours).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To study different aspects of contemporary Catalan history and culture in depth.

Module Content: This module will look in some depth at particular aspects of Catalan history and culture (especially the literary and artistic movements of the 19th and 20th centuries and their effects on the development of contemporary Catalan culture, focusing on the relationship between urban space and cultural identity in Barcelona), using selected audiovisual, artistic and literary texts in Catalan as the basis for exploration and discussion.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Identify and describe the major cultural movements in 19th and 20th-century Catalonia.
?Critically analyse selected literary texts, art work, architecture and films by 19th and 20th-century Catalan writers, artists and directors.
?Explore and analyse the relationship between urban space and cultural identity.
?Understand and discuss the ways in which social and cultural identity is reflected in cultural representations.
?Understand and discuss Catalan culture and identity in a comparative, global context.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 3,000 word essay (50 marks); 1 in-class presentation (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (as prescribed by the Department).

On Chomsky and the Two Cultures of Statistical Learning

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12 x 2hr(s) Seminars.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Helena Buffery, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Lecturer(s): Dr Martin Veiga, Department of Hispanic Studies; Staff, Department of Hispanic Studies.

Module Objective: To explore approaches to the translation, interpretation and adaptation of texts about Spanish and Latin American business, culture and society.

Module Content: This course will examine relevant contemporary business, culture and society in the Hispanic World - Spain and its regions and Latin America, with particular focus on Mexico, Argentina and Chile. The course is text-based using a variety of print and digital media sources. Students will explore different ways of translating these texts and analyse existing translation, in order to gain an understanding of the linguistic and cultural challenges of translation between Spanish and English in different sociocultural contexts.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
?Demonstrate an understanding of key issues, texts and concepts from the Hispanic world in the target language.
?Demonstrate an understanding of and situate these selected issues within their cultural and historical contexts.
?Analyse the relationship of selected issues to each other and to their cultural and historical contexts.
?Communicate their understanding appropriately in written and oral presentations.
?Demonstrate an understanding of and evaluate different approaches to translation and intercultural communication.
?Translate a range of different text types from Spanish into English.
?Use a range of digital tools and software to present work, as appropriate.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 translation analysis (50 marks); 1 translation portfolio (50 marks)).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated ((as prescribed by the Department of Hispanic Studies).).

Three Differences Between an Academic and an …

The study has investigated the relationship between culture and language learning in Pakistan. The motivational factors (i.e. instrumental or integrative motivation) of Pakistani learners have been reviewed in relation to culture and language teaching. For this purpose, first of all, the existing culture and language teaching models and approaches have been analyzed and their application in the context of L2 in Pakistan has been assessed. Then, native and non-native literature of English has also been discussed from a cultural point of view. The study, especially, investigated the cultural representation with respect to ESL learning in Pakistan in two areas. Firstly, the representation of culture in textbooks has been studied. The textbooks, which are used in Pakistan, have been analyzed in comparison with the textbook of other countries. They have been analyzed on the basis of the source culture, the target culture and the intercultural representation. Secondly, the study investigated the effectiveness of using the native culture for L2 learning in Pakistan. For this purpose, the selected extracts were used in class, and then the data was collected through questionnaire.

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