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Thomas Hardy - The Voice - Research Paper by Imtrix

"For the allusions to Hampden (1594-1643), Milton (1608-1674), and Cromwell (1599-1658), the student should refer to a History.
Instead of these three names there are, in the Original MS., Cato, Tully, and Caesar; but the change to well-known characters of our own country has added to the vividness as well as fixed the nationality of a poem that has been translated into so many languages.
It is noteworthy that both Hampden and Milton lived in Buckinghamshire - the county in which is the Stoke-Poges Churchyard. Hampden was M.P. for Buckingham, and it was as a resident of that county that he refused to pay ship money. Chalfont, in which is the cottage where Milton finished ''Paradise Lost,'' is only a few miles from the ''Churchyard'' of the ''Elegy.''
Mitford quotes the following from Plautus as the thought in brief of this stanza and lines : - ''Ut saepe summa ingenia in occulto latent, / Hic qualis imperator, nunc privatus est.'' - Captiv. iv. 2."

Together, Hardy and Ramanujan developed an analytic approximation to, although Hardy was initially awed by Ramanujan's intuitivecertainty about the existence of such a formula,and even the form it would have.

He was a skilled craftsman who builtthe best telescopes and microscopes of his day.
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The voice thomas hardy essays - Silva Commercial Cleaning

Greece was eventually absorbed into the Roman Empire(with Archimedes himself famously killed by a Roman soldier).
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The advanced artifacts of Egypt's Old Kingdomand the Indus-Harrapa civilizationimply strong mathematical skill, but the firstwritten evidence of advanced arithmetic dates from Sumeria,where 4500-year old clay tablets show multiplication anddivision problems; the first abacus may be about this old.

For this reason Thales may belong on this list for hishistorical importance despite his relative lack ofmathematical achievements.)

The composed by Apastambha contains mensurationtechniques, novel geometric construction techniques, a method of elementaryalgebra, and what may be an early proof of the Pythagorean Theorem.

The voice thomas hardy essays - ITL g

"Although nearly all the editors state that as a fact that the Elegy was begun in 1742, there seems to be no actual basis for this statement. In Mason's Memoirs of Gray (1775), p. 157, we find: ''I am inclined to believe that the Elegy in a Country Church-yard was begun, if not concluded, at this time also'' (August, 1742). But this is all the genuine evidence I have been able to discover. In Wakefield's Poems of Mr. Gray (1786), p. xi, we find: ''It is highly probable that the Elegy in a Country Church-yard was begun also about this time'' (August, 1742). Later editors state positively that it was begun in 1742 (Mitford, Gosse, Bradshaw, Rolfe, etc.). Mason seems to have had evidence for the 1742 date sufficient to satisfy Walpole, though what that evidence was we do not know. Writing to Mason, 1 December 1773 (Letters, VI, 22), Walpole says, speaking of the forthcoming Memoirs of Gray: ''There are ... errors in point of dates. ... The 'Churchyard' was, I am persuaded, posterior to West's death [1742] at least three or four years, as you will see by my note. At least I am sure that I had the twelve or more first lines from himself above three years after that period, and it was long before he finished it.'' Mason evidently made some satisfactory reply, for two weeks later, 14 December 1773 (Letters, VI, 31), Walpole writes: ''Your account of the 'Elegy' puts an end to my other criticism.'' Then Mason in 1775 made the statement just quoted above. At any rate, 1742 is the traditional date; we know that it was finished at Stoke Poges, in June, 1750 (see p. 70). It is not probable that Gray was steadily working at it all these years, even if he did begin it in 1742. For interesting conjectures as to causes that inspired the poem, see , Life of Gray, pp. 66, 96.
Gray was in no more haste to publish the poem than he had apparently been to complete it. After June, 1750, it was circulated in manuscript among his firends, and only an accident hastened its publication. An editor of the Magazine of Magazines, a cheap periodical, sent word to Gray that he was about to print it, and naturally the author did not care to have a poem of this nature make its entrance into the world by so obscure a by-path. He therefore had it published (anonymously) on February 16, 1751, by the great London publisher, Dodsley.
The Elegy leaped immediately into enormous popularity. Edition followed edition in rapid succession; it was translated into living and dead languages; and - a sure evidence of popularity - it was repeatedly parodied.
The facts as to its publication, etc., may be found in edition of Gray's Works, and in Gosse's Life of Gray, although Mr. Gosse curiously contradicts himself on pp. 66 and 96 of the latter book."

Thomas Hardy is a poet well known for his pessimism and dark and gloomy undertone in his poems
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"See note on Eton Ode .
To these two lines it has been objected that they are obscurely expressed, and seem to combine a blessing and a curse as if they were cognate ideas. But Gray defines his melancholy to West, May 27, 1742 'Mine, you are to know, is a white Melancholy, or rather Leucocholy for the most part, which though it seldom laughs or dances, nor ever amounts to what one calls Joy or Pleasure, yet is a good easy sort of state' &c. His melancholy was closely connected with his studious retirement, and its nature is exactly fixed in these two lines. Milton's Il Penseroso is Gray all over, and it is noteworthy that whereas Milton is certainly indebted to the verses prefixed to Burton's Anatomy of Melanchol for his two companion poems, Burton has given to his melancholy man some of the pleasures which Milton has transferred to L'Allegro. Gray might say with La Fontaine:

J'aime ... les livres, la musique
La ville et la campagne, enfin tout; il n'est rien,
Qui ne me soit souverain bien,
Jusqu'aux sombres plaisirs d'un coeur melancolique."

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‘The Voice’ by Thomas Hardy – English Language and …


Explain the poem "The Voice" by Thomas Hardy with …

"Milton's words again: -

... ''though from off the boughs each morn
We brush mellifluous dews.'' - Par. Lost, v. 428, 429.

''Together both, ere the high lawns appeared
Under the opening eyelids of the morn,
We drove afield.'' - Lycidas, 25-27.
After this stanza there is the following in the Original MS.: -
Him have we seen the greenwood side along,
While o'er the heath we hied, our labours done,
Oft as the woodlark piped her farewell song,
With wistful eyes pursue the setting sun.
''I rather wonder that he rejected this stanza, as it not only has the same sort of Doric delicacy which charms us peculiarly in this part of the poem, but also completes the account of his whole day; whereas, this evening scene being omitted, we have only his morning walk, and his noon-tide repose.'' - Mason.
In a footnote the reviewer of Mason's edition of Gray's Poems, in the ''Gentleman's Magazine,'' June, 1775, says Gray plainly alludes to this stanza and this evening employment when in a subsequent he mentions not only the customed hill, etc., but also the heath."

The Supernatural in 'The Voice" by Thomas Hardy - A …

"Milton's words again: -

... ''though from off the boughs each morn
We brush mellifluous dews.'' - Par. Lost, v. 428, 429.

''Together both, ere the high lawns appeared
Under the opening eyelids of the morn,
We drove afield.'' - Lycidas, 25-27.
After this stanza there is the following in the Original MS.: -
Him have we seen the greenwood side along,
While o'er the heath we hied, our labours done,
Oft as the woodlark piped her farewell song,
With wistful eyes pursue the setting sun.
''I rather wonder that he rejected this stanza, as it not only has the same sort of Doric delicacy which charms us peculiarly in this part of the poem, but also completes the account of his whole day; whereas, this evening scene being omitted, we have only his morning walk, and his noon-tide repose.'' - Mason.
In a footnote the reviewer of Mason's edition of Gray's Poems, in the ''Gentleman's Magazine,'' June, 1775, says Gray plainly alludes to this stanza and this evening employment when in a subsequent he mentions not only the customed hill, etc., but also the heath."

Thomas Hardy The Old Workman Free Essays - …

"G[ray]. wrote to Walpole, 3 March 1751 (Corresp i 344): 'I humbly propose, for the benefit of Mr. Dodsley and his matrons, that take awake for a verb, that they should read asleep, and all will be right.' If G. was referring to the comma which appeared after 'Awake', the fault was his own (see his letter to Walpole of 11 Feb. above). It was removed in ed 3.
In 1768 G. acknowledged as the source of this line Petrarch's Sonnet 169 (more usually numbered 170), which he himself had earlier translated into Latin (see p. 309): Ch'i veggio nel pensier, dolce mio fuoco, / Fredda una lingua, & due begli occhi chiusi / Rimaner doppa noi pien di faville (For I see in my thoughts, my sweet fire, one cold tongue and two beautiful closed eyes will remain full of sparks after our death). But there are other parallels with G.'s image and thought: e.g. Lucretius iv 925-6: Quippe ubi nulla latens animai pars remaneret / in membris, cinere ut multa latet obrutus ignis (Since, if no part of the spirit were left hidden in the limbs, like fire covered in a heap of ashes); Ovid, Tristia III iii 81-4: Tu tamen extincto feralia munera semper / deque tuis lacrimis umida serta dato. / quamvis in cineres corpus mutaverit ignis, / sentiet officium maesta favilla pium (Yet do you ever give to the dead the funeral offerings and garlands moist with your own tears. Although the fire change my body to ashes, the sorrowing dust shall feel the pious care); Propertius, Elegies II xiii 42: Non nihil ad verum conscia terra sapit (Not at all unconscious and witless of the truth are the ashes of man: i.e. of the way his memory is regarded after death); Ausonius, Parentalia, Praefatio 11-12: Gaudent compositi cineres sua nomina dici: / frontibus hoc scriptis et monumenta iubent (Our dead ones laid to rest rejoice to hear their names: and thus even the lettered stones above their graves would have us do). Arthur Johnston, Selected Poems of Gray and Collins (1967) p. 46, cites the translation of Euripides, Bacchae 8, in the life of Solon in Plutarch's Lives (1683) vol i: 'Still in their embers living the strong fire'. See also Young, Night Thoughts i 105-7: 'Why wanders wretched Thought their tombs around, / In infidel Distress? Are Angels there? / Slumbers, rak'd up in dust, Etherial fire?' The version of the line which appeared in edd 1-7 echoes Pope, Eloisa to Abelard 54: 'Warm from the soul, and faithful to its fires'."

English IGCSE Thomas Hardy Poem "The Voice" Essay …

"Gray himself quotes here in illustration:

''Ch'i veggio nel pensier, dolce mio fuoco,
Fredda una lingua, e due begli occhi chiusi
Rimaner dopo noi pien di faville.''
Petrarch, Son. CLXIX. CLI.
He had already, I believe, made the translation of this sonnet, which is preserved among his Latin poems; perhaps even the turn which he has given to it in the lines
''Nos duo cumque erimus parvus uterque cinis,''
and
''Ardebitque urna multa favilla mea,''
may have set him on embodying in this place of the Elegy the passage quoted. Petrarch's words serve Gray's purpose best if severed from their context. In this sonnet the poet plays with the image of flame. He is burning; all believe this, save her whom alone he wishes to believe it; his ardour, of which she makes no account, and the glory he has given her in his rhyme, may yet inflame a thousand others:
''For in my thought I see, - sweet fire of mine!---
A tongue though chilled, and two fair eyes, though sealed,
Fraught with immortal sparks, survive us still.''
Mitford quotes Chaucer, Cant. Tales, Reeve's prologue (3880):
''Yet in our ashen cold is fire yreken.''
But the Reeve is speaking of the passions of youth surviving in old age."

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